Live Music Crucial to Revive Footscray

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Week 6 Assessment: Hard News

Updated Copy

Footscray has seen 11 live venues suspend trade since the March lockdown.

Two new Footscray venues due to open in 2020, the Reverence and the Dancing Dog, have been left in limbo by the pandemic.

Footscray Community Arts Centre Creative Director, Arthur Tanzi said in 2020 the centre would host “less than a third” of the 3600 events it usually books each year.

Even with an end to lockdown restrictions, Mr Tanzi said social distancing would “severely limit live performance options”.

Multiple events and festivals at FCAC have been delayed until late 2021. A safe re-open for local venues would be “of huge importance for Footscray’s night-time economy,” said Mr Tanzi.

Pride of Our Footscray publican Matt O’Keefe said it could be up to a year before live music venues in Melbourne’s inner-west are able to function normally again.

Footscray State MP, Katie Hall, said she believed the pandemic had slowed but not stopped plans for a live performance precinct in Footscray.

“We want people travelling from around Melbourne to appreciate the talent and diversity of our amazing local artists,” said Ms Hall.

A planning committee of local venue owners, artists and Maribyrnong city councillors will continue to meet throughout the pandemic to look at state and federal grants for local ventures.

“It would be fair to say the live music scene will be crucial to a re-opened Melbourne,” said Ms Hall.

The Australian economy has lost over $500 million due to the closure of the live music industry during COVID-19.

Chair of the APRA Board of Directors, Jenny Morris said the loss would increase significantly the longer Australian communities remained in lockdown.

The performance industry union, the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance has disputed the figure, calling it “a deeply conservative assessment of the wider economic impact on local communities”.

Original Submission

The Australian economy has lost over $500 million due to the closure of the live music industry during COVID-19.

Chair of the APRA Board of Directors, Jenny Morris said the loss would increase significantly the longer Australian communities remained in lockdown.

The performance industry union, the Media Entertainment and Arts Alliance has disputed the figure, calling it “a deeply conservative assessment of the wider economic impact on local communities”.

Pride of Our Footscray publican Matt O’Keefe said it could be up to a year before live music venues in Melbourne’s inner-west are able to function normally again.

Footscray has seen 11 live venues suspend trade since the March lockdown.

Two new Footscray venues due to open in 2020, the Reverence and the Dancing Dog, have been left in limbo by the pandemic.

Footscray Community Arts Centre Creative Director, Arthur Tanzi said in 2020 the centre would host “less than a third” of the 3600 events it usually books each year.

Even with an end to lockdown restrictions, Mr Tanzi said social distancing would “severely limit live performance options”.

Multiple events and festivals at FCAC have been delayed until late 2021. A safe re-open for local venues would be “of huge importance for Footscray’s night-time economy,” said Mr Tanzi.

Footscray State MP, Katie Hall, said she believed the pandemic had slowed but not stopped plans for a live performance precinct in Footscray.

“We want people travelling from around Melbourne to appreciate the talent and diversity of our amazing local artists,” said Ms Hall.

A planning committee of local venue owners, artists and Maribyrnong city councillors will continue to meet throughout the pandemic to look at state and federal grants for local ventures.

“It would be fair to say the live music scene will be crucial to a re-opened Melbourne,” said Ms Hall.